INFLUOMA

To increase our knowledge of influenza infection in the host itself and to determine the role of the bacteriome and virome present in birds in the evolution of the infection.

  • Project start: June 2021
  • End of project: June 2024
  • Funding: 2020 call for “R&D&I projects”. Ministry of Science and Innovation
  • Budget: 225.660 €
  • Partnerts: IRTA-CReSA, SaBio-IREC

Avian influenza causes great losses for the poultry sector. A clear example is the outbreaks that are currently being detected in Europe. In the last month, infection has been detected in more than 40 farms and more than 1,700,000 birds have died or been culled in 9 countries.

In addition, the virus has been detected in 549 wild birds found dead or moribund in 10 countries, including Spain, where an infected peregrine falcon was found in Cantabria at the end of November.The introduction of influenza viruses into a territory is usually associated mainly with migratory wild birds, so it is common to implement biosecurity measures on farms and it is vital to maintain surveillance programmes for the early detection of possible outbreaks.

On the other hand, little is yet known about the mechanisms of resistance/sensitivity to avian influenza infection inherent in the birds themselves.

In addition, it has been confirmed that the composition of bacterial and viral communities has a major effect on the proliferation of specific micro-organisms, some of which are known pathogens for birds or are even zoonotic, potentially affecting humans. In the case of avian influenza it has already been shown that birds infected with the virus are also infected to a greater extent with agents such as salmonella or mycobacteria.

It is therefore necessary to increase our knowledge of influenza infection in the host itself and to determine the role of the bacteriome and virome present in birds in the evolution of the infection.